Ugg boots for adults and children; where do you stand?

Children and adult's Ugg BootsIs there any item of clothing more likely to divide opinion than the Ugg boot? They are surely the Marmite of the footwear world. Apart from dungarees and hareem pants, I can’t think of many other items of clothing that polarise opinion in such a strong way.

OK, so they have all the looks and glamour of an orthopaedic shoe, but they are very warm, and as someone who is perpetually cold, I am a big fan – as is Kate Moss. It’s a constant surprise to me that I love something so practical, as a lot of my teenage years were spent arguing with my Dad about the suitability of what I was wearing (his most-repeated phrase “It’s not a fashion parade!”) One of the only good things about the dark and miserable Autumn we’re having is being able to get mine out of the cupboard. I do have my limits though – I only like the tall classic ones, and I’d never wear them out in the evening (OK, I did once, but it was snowing).

Baby Ugg bootsHowever – when looking for winter shoes for Eliza I came across the range of children’s Uggs. And despite my love for the adult boot, even I was unsure. The baby ones are cute but completely unnecessary. And the ones for older children? Not only are they not, despite appearances to the contrary, the most practical of shoes so not great for wobbly walkers (as anyone who has worn them in anything more than a light frost knows, the soles aren’t the grippiest). And costing anywhere up to £150, they seem ridiculously expensive for shoes your child will undoubtedly grow out of in five minutes.

So, in the style of a teenage magazine barometer, Ugg boots for adults and children; love or loathe?

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I'm an early thirty-something new mum writing about pregnancy, babies and life living in our little corner of London.

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11 thoughts on “Ugg boots for adults and children; where do you stand?”

  1. I have a pair! I love wearing them as they’re so comfy, but I’d only wear them for the pre-school run or slobbing around in, as I don’t think they’re particularly flattering on my short legs! I’m not a fan of the kids ones – mainly because they provide no foot support at all and aren’t great for little feet, especially when you’re hypermobile with no instep, like my daughter.

  2. I’ve never owned a pair but there’s something about them I quite like. However, when it comes to paying £150 for boots, then I want proper leather and now ones that will smell like a wet dog when it rains. For children? I just can’t believe they’re good for their feet as they offer little ankle support. Cute though, for sure.

    1. Mine are pretty old now (and to be fair they have stood the test of time well) but at first I was terrified of getting them wet. Which is ridiculous when you think about the amount of times it rains here! The more waterproof ones look like snowboots too – eeek.

  3. I love Ugg boots in spite of myself. Like you, I’m always cold – and I can’t go past the feeling of sheepskin on my feet to keep them warm. I like your rules though, and I’m the same – only the classic ones and never in the evening. I can’t see that they’re necessary for little people though. They’re not practical enough for my little boy – we need wellies or something sturdier to cope with his antics! And for my baby girl – they just aren’t worth the money for a non-walker.

    1. They’re really not practical for children, aren’t they? The normal ones aren’t waterproof and it’s not great to get the material wet – how / why would you tell an 18-month-old to stay out of the puddles? P.S. I’m glad it’s not just me that’s always cold!

  4. I love the idea but not the price or the practicality,would probly be warmer than wellies but u could buy an awful lot of thick socks to go in wellies. Children become fashion concious early enough without Mums buying them for a young child as a fashion statement

    1. They are really impractical for children, aren’t they? Much better to get some really colourful wellies for jumping in puddles in (and big thick socks) xx.

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